Topic 2 Methodology of training toolkit design

The Training Toolkit makes use of the conclusions drawn from the research phase of the project. During this research phase institutional, legal and practical gaps as well as training needs among the target groups were identified through desk and field research in the project partner countries and beyond. The purpose was to develop educational material that is both specific to local contexts (i.e. the toolkit is tailored to respond to the gaps, needs and expectations of the national context in each partner’s country) as well as transferable and adaptable to different contexts both within and outside the consortium countries.

The PRESERVERE Training Toolkit is based on a blended learning methodology. It employs both individual online reading and content processing activities but also various case studies that comprise main aspects of the pre-gained knowledge.

The PRESERVERE Training Toolkit is based on a blended learning methodology. It employs, among other, both individual online reading and content processing activities but also various case studies that comprise main aspects of the pre-gained knowledge.

The online toolkit is based on an extended offline version. The offline version is downloadable in pdf format and comprises a PowerPoint presentation accompanied by a script with instructions and tips to the trainer. The online version is a more inclusive and online-friendly version of the offline version – meaning that it covers all the offline material but in a way that the material is adapted to an online learning environment.

If you are a trainer who wishes to use the full training toolkit for face-to-face workshops, then you can download the extended offline version here:https://bit.ly/3EXL93J

Though, even in the case of face-to-face workshops, it is strongly recommended that the online platform is utilized in order to enhance the eventual independence of target groups regarding real work life problem solving.

This transferability and adaptability is achieved in a twofold manner: first, through the online toolkit, which rather than being only content-dependent it also offers a common approach and method to delivering the otherwise context-specific material; second, through the composition of the consortium itself, whose composition of partners includes national contexts that present varying levels of efficacy in transposing and implementing the EU legal framework.

The latter variability not only affords a great degree of good practice interchange to occur within the consortium, but also drives innovation, since training plans, techniques and approaches that have already been successful in certain national contexts can be adapted, through the Toolkit, to different contexts and re-purposed to cover other emerging needs and gaps.